Paddington Movie Reflection

I have fond memories of spending part of every summer with my grandparents. When we would stay with G and P, my sister and I would sleep in the bedroom with the red carpet on the bed that was my Dad’s. I loved this bed because the headboard was a bookshelf. And on that bookshelf was a set of Paddington Bear books. Grandma used to read to us every night. When I got bigger, I got to be the reader. I’m not sure how many times we made it through those books or if we ever finished one before it was time to go home. I remember the note around his neck, “Please look after this bear” and how Paddington would get into trouble accidentally of course.
When the Paddington movie came out a few years ago, I wanted to see it in the theaters. Sadly, I did not see the movie until this week. In the comfort of my own living room I was transported to Darkest Peru where Paddington lived. I saw as he met the Brown Family. I watched him make mess after mess. And I smiled and laughed. It is silly and fun and reminded me of evenings spent reading books at 510. If you imagined what Paddington Bear would look like on the big screen, give this movie a try. You’ll be reminded that home and family do not look the same for everyone, and that’s okay.
The movie ends with this line by Paddington Bear, “Mrs. Brown says that in London everyone is different, and that means anyone can fit in. I think she must be right-because although I don’t look like anyone else, I really do feel at home. I’ll never be like other people, but that’s alright, because I’m a bear. A bear called Paddington.”

Take Time for Reflection (Confirmation)

Too often, we rush from one activity to the next without allowing ourselves any time to reflect on our experiences. We need to slow down and look over what we have done and then move on to the next thing. These are questions I shared at the final session of a confirmation class to give us time to reflect on what we had done together and what we would do next.

I hope you’ll use these questions in your confirmation classes or adapt them to help yourself reflect on an ending before moving on to your next thing.

What is left?

Any last minute questions?

What do you wish we had done?

What was the best part of confirmation?

What was the worst part of confirmation?

What would you change?

What books of the Bible did you read? And what did you think of them?

Say a little something about your time with mentors?

What did you think about the meeting of the church you attended?

What about your service project?

So where do we go from here? After confirmation, you have the opportunity to be a member of this congregation. We’ve talked about what you plan to do as a member. In youth group, we filled out the time and talents surveys.

What are your hopes for your church?

What do you think you’ll remember about confirmation in 10 years?

Psalm 90:2 and a Reflection

My days are spent visiting people. Some are happy to see me and want to tell me all their stories. Others say very little to me. A recent visit has stayed with me because my hospice patient was so peaceful. When I entered her room she was laying in her bed with her eyes closed and her hands folded on her chest. The expression on her face was one of peace. She wasn’t smiling and she wasn’t frowning. She looked content. 
I said hello and introduced myself. I asked if I might read some Scriptures because I knew from previous visits that this was something she enjoyed. She agreed. When I began to read, she closed her eyes and folded her hands. She assumed the posture of listening and receiving God’s Word. It was inspiring. After reading a few passages, we talked about how we do not spend enough time reading and listening to Scriptures. We talked about all that is contained in this book we love. And she asked me to read more. So I read on and then I prayed for her. 
I left that visit feeling as if her peace had rubbed off on me. I felt calmer. My outlook felt brighter. I wanted to spend more time in Scripture. So today I thank God for the wonderful woman whose peaceful spirit inspired me and urged me to spend more time reading the Bible.
 
Loving God, Thank you for the people who enter our lives to teach us, to inspire us, to guide us, and to love us. Open our eyes to the opportunities we have to teach, inspire, guide, and love each other. It is so easy to get wrapped up in our busy schedules. Slow us down, Holy One, so we may see you in the people around us. Slow us down and bring us your peace. Amen. 
 
Before the mountains were born,
    before you birthed the earth and the inhabited world—
    from forever in the past
    to forever in the future, you are God. -Psalm 90:2

Thank you, God, for summertime!

Thank you, God, for summertime!
Last weekend, my husband and I went kayaking. Finally the kayak we purchased in the middle of winter left our yard and floated across the water. It isn’t a long trip from our backyard to the water, and yet, it took more than six months for this to happen. As we paddled around our lake/pond (depends on who you ask), we saw turtles, a heron, so many geese, and a frog. It was peaceful and beautiful.
This is my yearly call to go outside. Get out and enjoy God’s amazing creation. Sit and read a book outside. Go for a walk. Head to the beach. Come visit me and we’ll go kayaking together. Take a drive and roll the windows down! Go explore, enjoy, and thank God for the amazing place we get to live.
Creating God, Thank you for this world you gave us to tend and cultivate. Thank you for plants and animals with whom we share this planet. Thank you for days of sunshine and thunderstorms. When the temperature warms up, coax us back outside so we can enjoy and experience the world around us. Thank you for sunscreen and big hats! Thank you for quiet time alone in creation and gatherings with others to celebrate. You have entrusted this planet to us, so remind us to enjoy it and care for it. Amen.

Happy Birthday, Grandpa!

Happy Birthday, Grandpa!
Today is my maternal grandfather’s 94th birthday. On my side of the family, he is the last grandparent. All four of my grandparents played a large part in my life. My sister and I would spend a month with each set of grandparents in the summer. With this Grandpa, we’d be on the farm. We would pull weeds from the garden and get paid one penny for every nail we picked up from the driveway or machine shop. We’d can and freeze fruits and vegetables for the winter. We would play with the cats and one dog. Grandma would drive the pickup truck out into the field so we could give Grandpa and the “hired man” a cool drink of water. We would play cards in the evening while watching tv from the satellite dish. We would shoot off fireworks on the 4th of July and ride a bike in the town parade. We would swim in the creek (pronounced crick) and ride the three wheeled bicycle. And every Sunday we’d go to church.
Today the song, Faith of our Fathershas been playing in my head. And I would have used the gender neutral, Faith of the Martyrs, from the New Century Hymnal, but I wasn’t thinking about those ancestors in our faith. Today, I’m thinking about and thankful for the regular people in my life who lived out their faith and passed it on to the next generation. I’m thankful for my grandfather’s 94 years of life, and I’m thankful for the opportunity to see him soon to celebrate with him.
Faithful God,
Thank you for the people in our lives who live our their faith in quiet, simple ways. Thank you for the people we see in church each week. Thank you for those who take us under their care and show us how to love you. Thank you for grandparents, aunts, uncles, parents, cousins, siblings, both those who are our blood relatives and our chosen families. Open our eyes and our spirits to the ways we can share our faith in simple ways too.
Loving God,
Thank you for Grandpa. Be with all the older adults who aren’t able to live in their homes anymore. Watch over them when their families cannot be present. Remind them they are loved by you and by families and friends. We give thanks for those who make it their life’s work to care for others. For another year of life, we give you thanks. Amen.
Grandpa’s First Selfie!

A Prayer for Technology And All of Us Who Use It!

I wish I could say I’ve unplugged lately because I knew it would be good for me. Sadly, no! The truth is I received a text alerting me that I was nearing my data limit. As someone who refuses to give any unnecessary money to my cell service provider, I turned off my data for the rest of my billing cycle.
Here’s what I learned-
Without my GPS, I had to pay attention. I followed directions, watched for street signs, and kept my eyes open. Also, I turned around in driveways and met a nice man on a quiet street who directed me to his neighbor’s home knowing his neighbor was my new hospice patient. Lest you think this is a HIPPA violation, the man said, “If you are looking for _____’s house, it is right there.”
I reach for my phone whenever I have an extra moment or things are quiet. Without access to social media, I listened more. I looked people in the eye. At first I was picking up my phone all the time until I realized, it was only a phone and I couldn’t access the internet. Soon the habit was unlearned.
As I reflect on my unplugged time, I plan to keep this practice up for periods of time each day. I enjoyed being more engaged with those around me, and I recognize the importance of social media in keeping me connected with those I love.
Loving God,
Help me to put down my phone and see creation and the people around me. Help me to acknowledge the ways technology helps me and hinders me. Grant me discernment so I may use my time wisely. When my plans change, open my eyes to the ways small changes in my life can become life changing spiritual practices. Amen.

A Prayer for The Distracted

A Prayer for The Distracted
On a recent rainy Saturday afternoon, I sat down with my computer planning to be productive. Not too long later, I was enjoying this video. When I done singing along with the video, I attempted to get back to my original plan. In the midst of working on my project, I did the dishes and laundry as almost anything seemed more enjoyable than what I needed to do.
How do you handle distractions? How can we remain attentive to what we need to be doing? How can we pay attention to what distracts us? Where might the Holy Spirit be working in distractions and calling us to that which is more important? How do we discern what is an interruption that can be ignored and an interruption which requires our immediate attention?
God of All Our Days,
We are busy people with much to do. Disrupt our busyness, so we see you working in our lives. Surprise us! Awaken us to new possibilities. And when we are need to focus, calm the noises and worries before they overtake us. Help us to be present with those who need us when they need us. Guide us, Holy One, for there is much to be done and much we can leave undone. With you, we know the difference. Amen.

Theology of Stuff

On a recent Sunday afternoon, I did what everyone does on Sunday afternoons. I typed my name into google to see what popped up. Imagine my surprise at seeing something I’d written that was published on New Sacred in December 2015. A lot was happening in late 2015 in my life, and somehow I missed that this piece was published.

Better late than never, we can celebrate the publication of this piece and hope it inspires me to write for them again. Enjoy the Theology of Stuff.

Celebrating Earth Day with Faithful Families by Traci Smith

In my work with children, youth, and families, I was always searching for great ideas and resources to share with others. One of the resources that I highly recommend is Traci’s Smith, Faithful Families. In this new book, you’ll find all the information you need to create a variety of spiritual practices for your family or for yourself. My review of the book will be shared soon, and in the meantime, I’d like to highlight one of the practices from the book.

Earth Day is coming up soon and Traci does a wonderful job of helping us combine celebrating Earth Day with God’s love of creation. (In fact, all of the practices are ways of acknowledging God’s presence and our connectedness to God and each other in our regular, daily lives).

Earth Day-Feeding the Birds begins with a brief reflection and introduction. “This practice is designed to help children honor creation every year on Earth day by reading the creation story and making a bird feeder” (56). This practice is recommended for ages 4 and up and can be completed with only pipe cleaners and O-shaped cereal. You can make this bird feeder in about 10 to 15 minutes. You’ll want to gather your family outside on Earth Day with a Bible and bird feeder making supplies. Read Genesis 1 together. Next you’ll talk about creation as a family. You can use the question provided like “What is your favorite part of creation?” (56) or use your own questions. To create the bird feeder you simply string the cereal on the pipe cleaner and bend it into the shape of a ring. Place your bird feeder on a tree and say a prayer together.

Each practice includes notes and variations to help you. The practices are written as a script so you can easily follow along or pass the book to older children or other family members to share the reading responsibility. The script includes options for everything you need to say including prayers, introductions, and questions. As you can see from the Earth Day practice, the intention of the practices in this book is to make it easy for your family to find ways to “create sacred moments at home.”

I hope you’ll spend some time out in creation on Earth Day creating sacred moments. And I hope you’ll add the book, Faithful Families,  to your family library and your church library. For more information about this book and many other resources, please visit http://www.traci-smith.com.

 

 

I was given a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review of this book.

Remember! – A Sermon

Luke 24:13-35

“Remember!”

Originally preached at St. Giles Presbyterian Church on August 1, 2010.

 

No matter what our age, it can be difficult to remember everything that needs to be remembered.  What are some things you must remember?  Phone numbers, birthday and anniversaries, enough information to pass a test, the items on the grocery or to do list, what day it is, where we parked the car, what time our next appointment is.  How do you remember all these things?  To do lists, post-its, calendars, reminder emails, notes, tying a string around your finger, writing on your hand, telling someone else to remind you.  Even with all these helps, how are we supposed to remember everything?  And as if we didn’t have enough to remember, in today’s Scripture Jesus is asking us to remember one more thing.  The one thing Jesus asks us to remember is Jesus.  That is why we gather at this table regularly-to remember Jesus.  

 

We need to remember Jesus not because we forget him.  It’s more like we put other things and people in front of him.  It isn’t intentional that this or that comes before Jesus. Soon, this or that have piled up and more and more things have taken precedence and Jesus, well, he was first, right up front, and now…well he is here somewhere under the clutter.  Coming to worship when we have communion, when we come to Christ’s table is a time to remember to push all that other stuff out of the way and move Jesus back up to the front of our minds and hearts.  

 

And scriptures are like that too.  You may know this scripture well.  It is a favorite passage for many people including me…sometimes it gets pulled out once a year to be read at Eastertime.  If we only hear it once a year, how can we remember? Do you remember all the things on your to do list from the beginning of the summer? Probably not.   And just like our to do lists, we need to remember so we can act on what we know to be true.  

 

Our story from Luke’s gospel takes place on Easter evening. It has been a difficult week for those who loved Jesus.  A week ago, there was a triumphant entry in Jerusalem.  During the week, there was a last meal together and then came Friday.   The disciples and followers of Jesus believed he was the One to change things, the one to make things right.  And then he dies.  And they are lost. Their king, their leader, their hero is gone. Now this morning people are seeing and saying things thought to be impossible.  The tomb is empty and no one knows exactly what is happening.  Things aren’t making sense.  

 

Now we meet two people who loved Jesus who are on a journey to Emmaus.  They have a 7 mile journey to talk about all that has been going on.  On their journey they are joined by a man they do not know.  This stranger comes and joins their journey.  The narrator tells us-the readers and the listeners-that this is Jesus and yet these 2 who loved, followed, and trusted him do not know who he is.  We are told “their eyes were kept from recognizing him.”  This statement leads us to ask who or what kept their eyes from recognizing Jesus?  Without this sentence, we might think they didn’t recognize Jesus because they didn’t expect to see him walking on the road.  He died.  They know this.  There are stories about an empty tomb.  Who would imagine Jesus would walk to Emmaus on the day of his resurrection?  But it doesn’t say they didn’t recognize Jesus.  It says they were kept from recognizing him.  Maybe they were not ready to see him yet.  To fully understand, they needed to hear him explain and watch him break the bread.  Only then would they be prepared to see who this stranger was.  Instead of seeing this as these two men being manipulated, look at their inability to see as God’s compassion.  God gave them time to prepare for this experience that leaves their hearts burning within their bodies.  

 

So we have three men walking from Jerusalem to Emmaus on a Sunday evening.  And this stranger, who we know is Jesus, says to the other two, “What are these words that you have been pitching back and forth to each other?”’   This question stops them.  They stop walking and look sad.  The Message says, “They just stood there, long-faced, like they had lost their best friend.”  And they had lost their best friend and their hope only three days ago.  

 

Cleopas speaks to this stranger and his question is funny to those of us who know he is talking to Jesus.  Cleopas asks, “Are you sojourning alone in Jerusalem and have not learned all that has happened recently?”  Cleopas asks this question to the only one who knows everything that has happened.  Jesus knows because he experienced it!

 

Jesus acts as though he does not know the answer when he says, “What things?”  Their answer not only describes the one they are walking with, it is also their faith statement.  ‘The things about Jesus of Nazareth, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people, and how our chief priests and leaders handed him over to be condemned to death and crucified him. But we had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel.’

 

By this point, it seems Jesus can’t believe they are still in the dark.  How can they be so foolish and slow to understand?  The preacher, Barbara Brown Taylor describes the next scene this way, “Starting with Moses and working his way through the prophets, the stranger opens the scriptures to them and they hang on his words.  He is a gifted preacher, but it is more than that.  They are wounded, and what he is telling them is good, good news.  Maybe they aren’t losers after all.  Maybe the rumors are true.  Maybe there is reason to resurrect their crucified hope” (Barbara Brown Taylor, Gospel Medicine, A Cowley Publications Book, 1995, p. 24).

 

Even though he is still a stranger to them, the men extend hospitality-a meal and a place to stay-to this man.  He accepts.  And this is the moment that will change their lives.  As they sit down to eat, the guest becomes the host.  “When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him.”  The same gestures and words make them and us remember the feeding of the multitude and the Last Supper.  They know those words and they know who this is.  They recognize Jesus!   The story does not end there!  Even though it is late, they have to share this good news.  They have seen Jesus.  They must tell.  They must share this good news!

 

Who are Cleopas and his friend?  This is the only time we meet these regular folks.  God uses them to tell this miraculous story?  Couldn’t God use us too?  In order for God to use Cleopas and his friend, first their eyes had to be opened so they could see Jesus was with them.  We need to have our eyes opened so we can see Jesus.  Where will we see Jesus?

 

This meal at the communion table is a meal of remembrance.  When we come to this table, we are reminded to look for Jesus.  Look for Jesus in the person who serves you communion.  Look for Jesus in the person next to you in line to receive communion.  This meal and this story call us to remember that we can’t just look for Jesus inside these walls.  We must be looking for Jesus in the people we meet everywhere.  Our mission team is going to West Virgina this week.  They are going not only to sweat and fix things.  They go to see Jesus in the people they meet, to build relationships, and to see Jesus in each other.  

 

It isn’t easy.  These faithful followers of Jesus didn’t recognize him only days after his death.  How can we see Jesus in others today 2000 years later?  When we see people serving one another, breaking bread together, breaking down barriers that separate us, when we see those in need we must look for Jesus and we will find him in the people he loves.  

 

What does it mean for us to see Jesus in others? If I see Jesus in you, will I treat you differently?  Will you suddenly sit up straighter and behave better as if the teacher or pastor has entered the room?  If we look for Jesus in others, will it remind us to love God with all our heart and our neighbor-all of our neighbors-as ourselves?  Looking for Jesus in others might lead us to eat a meal with a tax collector, a prostitute, an outcast, or a sinner.  We come to this table because we are invited and because we need to come and be refreshed and renewed so we can look for Jesus in those we love and those we wish we could love.  

 

And just as we need to see Jesus in others, we need others to see Jesus in us.  Sometimes we are the wounded, the needy, the physically or spiritually hungry.  We need others to recognize that Jesus lives in us too.  We, too, need to be remembered.

 

As hearers of the word and those who we remember the word, we can be “slow of heart to believe” or “know the joy of those whose hearts burn within them.”  Which way do we choose to remember?

 

Let us pray-”Lord Jesus, stay with us, for the Sabbath has now begun and we have many miles to journey before we rest; be our companion on the way, kindle our hearts and awaken hope, that we may know you as you are revealed in scripture and the breaking of bread.  Grant this for the sake of your love.  Amen.”